Publications

The South Caucasus - Between integration and fragmentation

21 May 2015
Mehmet Ögütçü (Chairman, Global Resources Partnership (UK); Executive Chair, The Bosphorus Energy Club (Istanbul)), Fuad Chiragov (Research Fellow, Foreign Policy Analysis Department, the Center for Strategic Studies under the President of Republic of Azerbaijan (SAM)), Vusal Gasimli (Head, Economic Analysis and Global Affairs Department, the Center for Strategic Studies under the President of Republic of Azerbaijan (SAM)), Kornely Kakachia (Professor, Department of Political Science, Tbilisi State University; Director, Georgian Institute of Politics (GIP)), Reshad Karimov (Independent expert), Andrey Makarychev (Guest Professor, Institute of Government and Politics, University of Tartu), Farhad Mammadov (Director, the Center for Strategic Studies under the President of Republic of Azerbaijan (SAM)), Gulshan Pashayeva (Deputy Director, the Center for Strategic Studies under the President of Republic of Azerbaijan (SAM)), Amanda Paul (Senior Policy Analyst), Dennis Sammut (Member of the EPC's Strategic Council; Director, LINKS), Zaur Shiriyev (Senior Research Fellow, ADA University) and Cavid Veliyev (Head, Foreign Policy Analysis Department, the Center for Strategic Studies under the President of Republic of Azerbaijan (SAM))



The South Caucasus is situated at the intersection of Eurasia’s major transport and energy corridors, making it an important geostrategic region. Traditional regional actors Iran, Turkey and Russia have jostled for influence and power in the region for centuries, and are now faced with competition from the EU, China, the US and NATO. Although Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia have been independent for more than two decades, they still continue to feel the sway, and sometimes threat, of external actors. As a response, the three South Caucasus states have chosen very different geostrategic paths since the collapse of the Soviet Union, leaving the region more fragmented and volatile than ever. In this book, various authors offer a deep and broad understanding of the developments in the South Caucasus, analyse the different foreign trajectories that each of the three state is following, and highlight the impact of external actors’ policies.

The South Caucasus
Article by Vusal Gasimli on Trade, economic and energy cooperation: challenges for a fragmented region
Article by Mehmet Ögütçü on China in the South Caucasus: not a critical partnership but still needed
Article by Kornely Kakachia on Europeanisation and Georgian foreign policy
Article by Gulshan Pashayeva on Security challenges and conflict resolution efforts in the South Caucasus
Article by Fuad Chiragov and Reshad Karimov on Policies from afar: the US options towards greater regional unity in the South Caucasus
Article by Farhad Mammadov on Azerbaijan's foreign policy – A new paradigm of careful pragmatism
Article by Dennis Sammut on Armenia – Stuck between a rock and a hard place
Article by Cavid Veliyev on Turkey's role in the South Caucasus: between fragmentation and integration
Article by Andrey Makarychev on Russia's policies in the South Caucacus after the crisis in Ukraine: the vulnerabilities of realism
Article by Amanda Paul on The EU and the South Caucasus – Time for a stocktake
Article by Amanda Paul on Iran's policy in the South Caucasus – Between pragmatism and realpolitik
Article by Zaur Shiriyev on NATO's South Caucasus paradigm: beyond 2014